How to Use Aeroplans Stopover and Layover Rules to Maximize Your Travel

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Key Takeaway: Aeroplans stopover and layover rules allow you to visit multiple destinations, enjoy longer stays, and create your own round-the-world trip at no extra cost. You can have up to two stopovers or one stopover and one open jaw on a round-trip award ticket, and up to one stopover or one open jaw on a one-way award ticket. A stopover is a stay of more than 24 hours in a city, while a layover is a stay of less than 24 hours. You can use the Aeroplan search engine or the multi-city tool to find and book your flights with stopovers and layovers.

Strategic travel route map with Aeroplan stopovers and layovers, showcasing planes hopping between iconic cities with infographic elements.
Maximize Your Journey: Aeroplan’s Stopover and Layover Strategy Unveiled.

Hustlers, do you want to make the most of your Aeroplan miles and see more of the world for less? If so, you need to know how to use Aeroplan’s stopover and layover rules to your advantage. These rules allow you to add extra destinations and longer stays to your award tickets, without paying more miles or fees. Sounds too good to be true, right? Well, it’s not. In this article, we’ll show you how to use Aeroplan’s stopover and layover rules to maximize your travel and create your own round-the-world trip with Aeroplan.

What are Aeroplans Stopover and Layover Rules?

First, let’s define what a stopover and a layover are, according to Aeroplan. A stopover is a stay of more than 24 hours in a city that is not your origin or destination. A layover is a stay of less than 24 hours in a city that is not your origin or destination. For example, if you fly from Toronto to Paris, and then from Paris to Rome, and you spend 48 hours in Paris, that’s a stopover. If you spend only 12 hours in Paris, that’s a layover.

Aeroplan allows you to have up to two stopovers or one stopover and one open jaw on a round-trip award ticket, and up to one stopover or one open jaw on a one-way award ticket. An open jaw is when you fly into one city and out of another, or when you return to a different city than your origin. For example, if you fly from Toronto to Paris, and then from Rome to Toronto, that’s an open jaw. If you fly from Toronto to Paris, and then from Paris to Vancouver, that’s also an open jaw.

The best part is that you can have these stopovers and open jaws at no extra cost in terms of miles or fees. You only pay the taxes and surcharges for the flights you take, which may vary depending on the airlines and routes you choose. This means that you can essentially get multiple trips for the price of one, and visit more places with the same amount of miles.

How to Find and Book Flights with Stopovers and Layovers with Aeroplan

There are two ways to find and book flights with stopovers and layovers with Aeroplan: using the Aeroplan search engine or using the multi-city tool. The Aeroplan search engine is the default option when you go to the Aeroplan website and click on “Book Travel”. It allows you to search for flights by entering your origin, destination, dates, and number of passengers. It will then show you the available flights and the miles and fees required for each option. You can filter the results by airlines, airports, flight duration, number of stops, and preferred cabin.

The Aeroplan search engine is good for finding simple itineraries, such as direct flights or flights with one connection. However, it may not show you all the possible options for flights with stopovers and layovers, especially if you want to visit multiple regions or continents. For example, if you want to fly from Toronto to Tokyo, with a stopover in Vancouver and a layover in Seoul, the Aeroplan search engine may not show you this option, even if it exists.

That’s why you may need to use the multi-city tool, which allows you to enter up to six segments for your itinerary. A segment is a flight between two cities, regardless of the duration or the number of connections. For example, if you fly from Toronto to Tokyo, with a stopover in Vancouver and a layover in Seoul, that’s four segments: Toronto to Vancouver, Vancouver to Seoul, Seoul to Tokyo, and Tokyo to Toronto. To use the multi-city tool, you need to click on “Multi-city” under the “Book Travel” tab on the Aeroplan website. You then need to enter the origin, destination, date, and preferred cabin for each segment. You can also specify the airlines you want to fly with, if you have a preference.

The multi-city tool is more flexible and powerful than the Aeroplan search engine, as it allows you to customize your itinerary and find flights with stopovers and layovers that may not be shown otherwise. However, it also requires more research and planning, as you need to know the routes and schedules of the airlines that fly with Aeroplan, and the availability of award seats on each flight. You may also need to try different combinations and dates to find the best option for your trip.

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How to Use Aeroplan’s Stopover and Layover Rules to Maximize Your Travel

Now that you know how to find and book flights with stopovers and layovers with Aeroplan, let’s see how you can use them to maximize your travel and create your own round-the-world trip with Aeroplan. Here are some tips and examples to inspire you:

  • Use stopovers to visit multiple destinations on the same continent or region. For example, if you want to visit Europe, you can fly from Toronto to London, with a stopover in Paris, and then from London to Toronto, with a stopover in Amsterdam. This way, you can visit three European cities for the same amount of miles as a round-trip ticket to London. You can also use stopovers to visit different regions within the same country, such as flying from Toronto to Vancouver, with a stopover in Calgary, and then from Vancouver to Toronto, with a stopover in Montreal.
  • Use stopovers to visit multiple destinations on different continents or regions. For example, if you want to visit Asia and Oceania, you can fly from Toronto to Tokyo, with a stopover in Hong Kong, and then from Tokyo to Sydney, with a stopover in Singapore. Then, you can fly from Sydney to Toronto, with a stopover in Auckland. This way, you can visit six cities on four continents for the same amount of miles as a round-trip ticket to Tokyo. You can also use stopovers to visit different regions within the same continent, such as flying from Toronto to Buenos Aires, with a stopover in Lima, and then from Buenos Aires to Toronto, with a stopover in Rio de Janeiro.
  • Use layovers to visit additional destinations for a short time. For example, if you want to visit Africa, you can fly from Toronto to Cape Town, with a layover in Istanbul, and then from Cape Town to Toronto, with a layover in Dubai. This way, you can visit four cities on three continents for the same amount of miles as a round-trip ticket to Cape Town. You can also use layovers to visit nearby destinations that are not worth a stopover, such as flying from Toronto to Rome, with a layover in Frankfurt, and then from Rome to Toronto, with a layover in Zurich.
  • Use open jaws to fly into one city and out of another, or to return to a different city than your origin. For example, if you want to visit South America, you can fly from Toronto to Lima, and then from Santiago to Toronto. This way, you can visit two countries and explore more of the continent by traveling overland or taking cheap flights between Lima and Santiago. You can also use open jaws to return to a different city than your origin, such as flying from Toronto to Bangkok, and then from Bangkok to Vancouver. This way, you can save time and money by not having to backtrack to your original departure city.

Conclusion

Hustlers, we hope this article has shown you how to use Aeroplan’s stopover and layover rules to maximize your travel and create your round-the-world trip with Aeroplan. By using these rules, you can visit more destinations, enjoy longer stays, and experience more of the world for less. You can use the Aeroplan search engine or the multi-city tool to find and book your flights with stopovers and layovers, depending on your preferences and needs. Remember, you can have up to two stopovers or one stopover and one open jaw on a round-trip award ticket, and up to one stopover or one open jaw on a one-way award ticket, at no extra cost in terms of miles or fees. So, what are you waiting for? Start planning your next trip with Aeroplan and HustleHub today! ✈️

Source: (1) Aeroplan – The Official Website. https://www.aircanada.com/ca/en/aco/home/aeroplan.html. (2) Avoid Aeroplan surcharges and blackout dates with booking service. https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/avoid-aeroplan-surcharges-and-blackout-dates-with-booking-service-1.3089231. (3) Aeroplan Flight Reward Policy. https://www.aircanada.com/ca/en/aco/home/aeroplan/legal/aeroplan-flight-reward-policy.html. (4) Air Canada Customer Service FAQ. https://www.aircanada.com/ca/en/aco/home/fly/customer-support/frequently-asked-questions.html.

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